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Coronavirus: Impact on the Hospitality Industry

All eyes are on the spreading coronvirus, COVID-19. Here you can follow the development and the impact of the coronavirus on the Hospitality Industry. Visit the WHO | World Health Organization for more information about the virus.

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Running a global hospitality business in a pandemic

Minor International is a hospitality industry powerhouse. Based in Bangkok, Minor operates more than 530 hotels in 56 countries, with a large presence in Asia (where it operates chains across the region, including the Anantara luxury hotel brand), Europe (where it runs the NH chain of hotels), and Africa.

Booking.com boss on why Brussels is hampering Europe's tech ambitions

It would be easy to assume that 2020 couldn't get much worse for Glenn Fogel. In February, the boss of Booking Holdings was already scrambling to keep up with waves of cancellations. Millions were pulling their travel plans over fears of Covid-19, and the sector was bracing for a severe downturn as holidaymakers were told they would need to self-isolate.

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Travel is no longer a privilege, but a right: Prof Dev

While speaking at the FICCI webinar on 'Future of Travel, Hospitality and Tourism Industry and the Way Forward', Professor Chekitan S Dev, School of Hotel Administration, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business, suggests that viewing the Covid-19 crisis as an opportunity will help the travel and hospitality industry learn new ways to survive and thrive in a 'better normal' world.

What Does A Biden Presidency Mean For Travel?

The global pandemic has canceled or delayed most travel plans for 2020. Now that we're in the waning weeks of the current calendar year, all eyes are looking to 2021. Specifically, many are wondering how a Biden presidency will impact their travel plans and the travel industry.

How Covid-19 May Permanently Shrink The Business Travel Market

When Covid-19 shut down economies around the world last spring, it also stopped all those trips business executives make to customers, suppliers, conventions, trade shows, and their company offices. Almost overnight, millions of people globally began working from home and using video-conferencing technology to transport themselves to meetings and negotiate deals.

CEOs hope for a strong 2021 as crisis continues

With vaccines and more efficient testing on the horizon, the coronavirus might not go away completely, but it can be handled and business will come back, hotel industry CEOs said on a panel as part of the online NYU International Hospitality Industry Investment Conference.

Can AI-driven tech help bring back tourism travel?

The global restrictions imposed since March this year due to Covid-19 has brought international travel to a screeching halt. It has caused a 22% fall in international tourist arrivals during the first quarter of 2020 and could further decline by 60-80% over the whole year.

Bookingcom President and CEO Glenn Fogel discusses Pandemic Impact

Since the pandemic started, I understand bookings on your travel platforms have plunged more than 80 percent. You've already suspended share buybacks and you've already raised some $4 billion in debts from investors, give us an idea of the cash position you're in right now, and how long a runway does it give you? GF: Yes, in the second quarter, we did our earnings announcement and we are absolutely fine.

The Future of Airbnb

In the travel wreckage caused by the pandemic, home-sharing has emerged as battered, but with a steady pulse, as rental houses became social-distancing refuges for the travel-starved.

World Tourism Day: How digital skills can support recovery

After months of isolation while living in quarantine, travel is the leisure activity that I miss the most. And I'm not alone. Our research, conducted with the Boston Consulting Group, shows that 31 percent of people hope to plan leisure travel once they feel safe enough to do so.

The future of travel

The future of travel used to be flying cars and faster-than-sound jets but Covid-19 has changed all that. Today the travel industry would simply settle for a resumption of some normality.

Most U.S. Airlines Are Getting Rid of Change Fees for Good

In its latest move to offer more flexibility to fliers during COVID-19, most major U.S. airlines have put an end to ticket change fees for good. United Airlines kicked off the trend, announcing on August 30 that going forward, it would no longer be charging change fees for all standard economy and premium cabin tickets for travel within the U.

Cvent Trends: Smaller Meeting Sizes, Lower ADRs, Chain Scale Shift

Many meetings since March have been canceled, postponed or moved to virtual platforms because of the Covid-19 pandemic, but about $2 billion worth of meeting requests for proposals during the second quarter of 2020 were sourced through meetings management company Cvent's network, Cvent senior director of analytics Jeffrey Emenecker said during the recent Cvent Connect virtual conference.

Lessons from COVID-19: teaching hospitality during a pandemic

By Ian Millar

We spoke to Ian Millar, who teaches at the prestigious Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne as a Senior Lecturer in Hospitality Technology and manager of the Institute of Business Creativity (IBC). Ian specializes in hospitality technology and is expertly placed to engage with students about new developments and where the industry will develop.

Why new hotels are opening amid the pandemic

To say that Covid-19 has hurt the hotel industry, along with travel as a whole, is something of an understatement.According to Hotel News Now, the news division of hotel research company STR, the sector has seen a loss of 5 million jobs since February in the United States alone.

Will travelers trash or treasure the planet after the pandemic?

Let's journey back to a different time. One that feels far away. Early January 2020.Travelers were gearing up for another boominfrom visits to Japan for the Olympics to cruises galore. But while we aimed for another year of far-flung trips, environmental activists continued their warnings about a growing climate catastrophe and the role travelers were playing.

Meliá Hotels Uses Local Influencers to Drive COVID-19 Awareness

Brochures and signage are easy to overlook, but social media influencers are harder to miss. As they work to bring back guests during the Covid-19 pandemic, a number of hotel chains are relying on partnerships with social media influencers to educate guests on the new safety protocols they've put in place.

What Today's Travelers Want In Their Accommodations

Here at Expedia Group Media Solutions, our continued mission is to support our advertising partners as they navigate the COVID-19 crisis, including sharing best practices, data, and insights. As we look toward recovery, we're working to understand how travelers are thinking about leisure travel in the time of COVID-19—their preferences, expectations of travel brands, and behaviors.

Will You Need an 'Immunity Passport' to Travel

The global economy has been severely disrupted by COVID-19, with the virus wreaking particular devastation on the travel industry. While international travel will eventually return, either as governments start to bring infection rates under control or with the development of a vaccine, it's a waiting game that many airlines, tour operators and hotels aren't willing to play.

Cruise trips are back. This is what they look like now

Boarding in the Italian port of Genoa for a seven-day Mediterranean cruise on August 16, travel agent Valeria Belardi prepared herself for a voyage like no other.Belardi was one of some 3,000 pioneering cruisers on board MSC Grandiosa, the first cruise liner to return to the Mediterranean following the global shut down of the multi billion-dollar cruise industry in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

How to Be a Mindful Hotel Guest During a Pandemic

With travel as one of the pandemic's hardest-hit industries, independently owned hotels have had a rough few months. Now that travelers around the world are slowly taking their first post-lockdown trips again, the things we once took for granted during a hotel stay (like twice-daily housekeeping and long restaurant menus) have become much harder to keep up due to new safety regulations and tighter budgets.

Meet the next-normal consumer

As the world begins its slow pivot from managing the COVID-19 crisis to recovery and the reopening of economies, it's clear that the lockdown has had a profound impact on how people live. The period of contagion, self-isolation, and economic uncertainty will change the way consumers behave, in some cases for years to come.

For corporate travel, a long recovery ahead

When the COVID-19 pandemic halted travel around the globe, business travelers had to pivot quickly from in-person meetings and events to virtual platforms. As the pandemic continues and travel-industry players look ahead for a rebound, our research shows that the postcrisis return will take years and that business travel will return at a slower pace than leisure travel.

Adapting to a new world - PwC on facing the challenges of the post-COVID-19 landscape

At PwC, we have been thinking about how to approach these issues holistically. In 2017, we identified a set of urgent, interdependent, and accelerating challenges confronting the world. We dubbed it the ADAPT framework — describing a world in which asymmetry, disruption, age, polarization, and trust were fundamentally changing the way millions of people live and work.

August 2020 Update On Coronavirus Travel Restrictions

It's hard to believe that we're almost three-quarters of a year into pandemic-related travel restrictions. August is typically the month for last-minute trips before a brand new school year. These are the closing weeks of the peak summer travel season before Labor Day weekend.

Reimagining the $9 trillion tourism economy—what will it take?

Tourism made up 10 percent of global GDP in 2019 and was worth almost $9 trillion, making the sector nearly three times larger than agriculture. However, the tourism value chain of suppliers and intermediaries has always been fragmented, with limited coordination among the small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) that make up a large portion of the sector.

This Type Of Mask Is Now Banned From Delta Flights

Delta is tightening regulations for mask-wearing on its flights and released a statement this week that masks with exhaust valves are no longer allowed on their aircrafts. "Any mask with an exhaust valve is not approved as an acceptable face mask for customers traveling on any Delta operated flight," the Delta website now states.

Can Big Brands Disrupt The Disruptors?

COVID-19 has potentially changed everything—ushering in the possibility for brands to disrupt the disruptors. Predictable and boring amenities and designs shared by brands ushered in independent boutique hotels, allowing for unique experiences and celebrations of local culture and art.

Meet America's Best Employers For Women 2020

Companies have made considerable progress in their quest for gender parity over the years, enacting strong hiring and retention practices that directly benefit female employees and offering family-friendly policies that place women at the center of these efforts.

Setting Up a Corporate Lodging Program

Researchers and procurement specialists predict lodging rates will fluctuate for the remainder of 2020 but remain lower than they were in 2019. To capture existing demand, hotels are expected to offer attractive rates for the upcoming request or proposal season.

The Future Of Affordable Travel

COVID-19 has upended the way we travel. Private jets, trips, tours and the like have been the go-to choice for those who can afford it, but where does that leave cost-conscious leisure travelers who .

Where will travel go in the future?

All of our lives have been affected by the pandemic. From restrictions on travel, postponement of large events like the Olympics, the need to home-school to the way we shop and maintain relationships, the disruption is unprecedented.

A grim future for business travel

Coronavirus lockdowns and the grand work-from-home experiment killed the business travel industry — and, just like everything else, it's not going back to normal anytime soon, if at all.

Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson On The Future Of The Hospitality Industry, Masks, And Furloughs

So you think you've had a rollercoaster year? Consider the tumultuous times of hospitality leader Arne Sorenson, the president and CEO of Marriott International. On the heels of the purchase and integration of Starwood Hotels and Resorts into the Marriott organization and a period of unprecedented growth for the combined company, Sorenson was diagnosed with Stage Two pancreatic cancer.

How Safe Are Hotel Pools This Summer?

In a mask-wearing, socially-distanced world, much has changed about the way we travel. But as states enter later phases of reopening plans amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, with hotels finally welcoming travelers back, some summer staples of travel remain.

How COVID-19 Will Change Air Travel As We Know It

In the heart of Australian outback lies Alice Springs. The town - colloquially known as Alice - is the site of indigenous human presence dating back nearly 30,000 years. More recently, however, a new (and admittedly very different) type of settler has descended upon Alice.

Making sense of artificial intelligence: AI in the (Increasingly Virtual) Workplace

The advent of the pandemic has resulted in the virtualization of many jobs, perhaps permanently. The associated increased quantification of the workplace will enable the accelerated adoption of AI. As our private and professional lives inevitably blur as we work more from home, we need ethical rules more than ever about how companies can use employee-generated data and deploy AI in the workplace.

What it's like to stay in a hotel right now.

This is the Dorchester Collection's grand country estate on the edge of Windsor Great Park, a white chiselled Georgian mansion at its heart, with sunken gardens, pathways through sweet meadowland and a clippety-clop reputation for its polo club, fields and royal guests.

Pandemic taught hotel industry to live with zero revenues and with fixed costs turning variable: Puneet Chhatwal

By Puneet Chhatwal

The last time when we interacted, things were looking down. There was virtually no business for the hospitality/hotel sector. Are things looking up now? Or is this just a start and there is a long road of recovery ahead for Indian Hotels?It is a start and we are very happy that the start has happened in some of the key sources of revenue or business for us.

The Coming Apocalypse for U.S. Airline Labor

Throughput at U.S. airport checkpoints, TSA figures show, is rising fast from its April lows. Twice last week, volumes topped 600,000, compared with fewer than 90,000 in mid-April. It's still a small fraction of what a typical June looks like, but people are indeed traveling more as summer begins.

Grounded: The Future of Travel

Will the world start traveling again at the same pace, or will businesses discover the merits of virtual convening? Will the sharing economy ever fully recover? How does the cruise industry and low-cost leisure travel rebound in a world that demands social distance? Brian Chesky, Co-founder, CEO and Head of Community, Airbnb; Arnold W.

What It’s Like To Stay In A Luxury Hotel Right Now

Travel came to a standstill in the United States in March, as the coronavirus emptied roadways, attractions, restaurants, bars, hotels and the skies. But there's finally some movement. As the lockdown lifts in cities all over the globe, more and more hotels are reopening.

Airbnb CEO: Travel may never be the same

Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky told Axios in an interview that global travel may never fully recover, and that he sees a future where people travel much more within their own countries, possibly for longer stays.

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