Industry Update
Opinion Article12 November 2019

An Unsatisfied Customer - The Life of a Hotel Doctor

By Mike Oppenheim, MD

share this article
1 minComments
Oppenheim

A Quantas flight attendant was vomiting, so I drove 49 miles to the Radisson in Newport Beach.

Advertisements

Fortunately, she was already getting better. She hadn't vomited in six hours. I told her that she should continue to improve and advised her to suck on ice chips. I went to the ice machine and filled tub. Normally, I would have left antinausea pills, but she was pregnant. She thanked me effusively as I left.

Soon after, a nurse from the airline phoned. Tactfully, she explained that the Quantas patient had "expressed concern." In her original call, the crew member had requested medicine for vomiting. A doctor had come but left without giving anything.

I explained that she was recovering and didn't need medicine. In any case, she was pregnant, so taking drugs was not a good idea. The nurse expressed complete sympathy.

Later, the director of the housecall agency phoned. Tactfully, he explained that a nurse had passed on some "concerns" expressed by a flight attendant. I repeated my explanation, and he expressed complete sympathy. The following day he phoned again to assure me that I had done the right thing and that he was working hard to make Quantas see the light.

Mike Oppenheim

In his regular column "The Life of a Hotel Doctor", Mike Oppenheim shares remarkable stories around visiting hotel guests as a doctor. When he began as a hotel doctor during the 1980s, only luxury hotels had a “house doctor,” usually a local practitioner who did it as a sideline. Nowadays, in a large city even the lowliest motel receives blandishments from a dozen individuals plus several agencies that send moonlighting doctors if they can find one.

    More from Mike Oppenheim
    Contact
    Mike Oppenheim
    Latest News
    Advertisements