Author
Author

Gabriel C. M. Laeis

Lecturer at IUBH International University

Gabriel C. M. Laeis

Gabriel C. M. Laeis is a published author on issues of sustainable tourism and has worked for a number of international hotel companies as well as a hotel management consultancy. He graduated from the IUBH School of Business and Management and the Victoria University, Melbourne, with a double degree in Hospitality Management. With a keen interest in social and environmental issues, he went on to do a M.Sc. in Organic Agriculture and Food Systems at the University of Hohenheim and is currently working toward his Ph.D. in Development Studies at Massey University, New Zealand. His research focusses on the interface between developing countries, food chains and the hospitality sector. He has recently undertaken research on the impact of culture on local food chains in Fiji.

Insights by Gabriel C. M. Laeis (7)

COVID-19: A stress test for sustainable development in hospitality?

This pandemic will cost many lives and even more jobs, no doubt. Employees in numbers I would not dare to estimate will see their livelihood options diminish – especially those in countries, which do not have reliable financial safety nets.

What is your take on the coronavirus and its impact on our industry?

This pandemic will cost many lives and even more jobs, no doubt. Employees in numbers I would not dare to estimate will see their livelihood options diminish – especially those in countries, which do not have reliable financial safety nets.

How can sustainability be communicated beyond clichés and greenwashing?

Certification and labels – whether legitimate or not – seems to be the marketing-weapon of choice when it comes to communicating a hotel's sustainability efforts. Consumers, however, trust especially those hotels, where they see not only third-party certification, but also a dedicated and visible involvement in everyday operations: waste sorting bins, organic food being served, a restaurant supporting local farmers, reusable glass bottles in rooms rather than one-way plastic bottles and so forth.

Hotel Sustainability: Top 3 Technologies to Implement in 2020

We will need a two-pronged approach, no doubt. Behavioral change of consumers, on the one side, as well as technological upgrading of the industry on the other side. Given the current scientific (and most of all: pessimistic!) outlook on how rapidly the climate crisis will strike over the next years, I fear that focusing on changing the behavior of billions of consumers – many of whom have not even come around to the notion of a 'climate crisis' – will not happen fast enough.

Who makes hospitality sustainability happen: Governments, Industry, Consumers?

Pushing for a more sustainable development in hospitality is undoubtedly a challenge that – in an ideal world – should be addressed by consumers, the industry and governments equally.
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