The "old" Thomas Cook, a 179-year-old company and the second largest tour operator in the world after TUI, collapsed in September of 2019. Fosun Tourism Group, a Chinese travel conglomerate that already owned the famed Club Med, bought the rights to the bankrupt company's brand for $14 million.

Now, a year later Fosun has resurrected the Thomas Cook brand as an online travel agency thomascook.com, selling directly to the public packaged beach holidays in destinations like Spain, Turkey, Greece, Croatia, USA, etc. and city breaks in Rome, Paris, Madrid, New York, etc.

The question is: Is there future for the "new" Thomas Cook?

Related Explainer

What is the 'New' Thomas Cook

Peter O’Connor
Peter O’Connor
Professor of Strategy at University of South Australia Business School
Erik Muñoz
Erik Muñoz
Chief Commercial Officer (CCO) at Lybra.tech

The ability of the "new" Thomas Cook to trade as a purely online business will be improved by not having the added costs of travel retail agencies, maintaining its own airline and operating their own brand of hotels.  But will those former customers who booked in the comfort of their local Thomas Cook agency, with the familiar faces of expert travel agents be willing to book online via ThomasCook.com?  I hope so, but it's no guarantee.  Having a strong offline travel brand doesn't mean they will transfer all of that goodwill (and traffic) to their new travel portal.  

Scott Dahl
Scott Dahl
Program Director, Master’s Degree in Hospitality Strategy and Digital Transformation at Les Roches Global Hospitality Education
Max Starkov
Max Starkov
Adjunct Professor NYU Tisch Center for Hospitality and Hospitality & Online Travel Tech Consultant
Nick Vivion
Nick Vivion
Founder at Ghost Works
Isabelle Jan
Isabelle Jan
Co-founder and manager of PrivateDeal SA
Simone Puorto
Simone Puorto
Founder | CEO | Futurist
Ross McAlpine
Ross McAlpine
Vice President, Client Services at Vizergy